Good Reads
about Asylum Seekers and Refugees


City of Thorns, Ben Rawlence (2016)
It tells of the life of 8 people living in Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya. The camp is the largest in the world, ½ million people live there; it opened 25 years ago and has been the permanent home to many people all their lives.  

This is Where I Am, Karen Campbell (2013)
Insightful, easy read taking us into the lives of a Father and his daughter when granted leave to remain in the UK and their friend/mentor from Glasgow.

The New Odyssey, Patrick Kingsley (2016)
The Guardian’s migration correspondent spends a year travelling the refugee routes across Europe.   This book tells the gripping story of some refugees making this journey along with readable commentary on the complexities of the refugee crisis globally and in Europe.  It makes clear argument that the best way to rid the world of smugglers is to have more legal means for some people to settle in another country. 

The Lightless Sky, Gulwali Passarlay (2015)
This remarkable young teenager makes it from Afghanistan to the UK and lives here.  A harrowing true story.  

The Burning Country, Robin Yassin-Kassab and Leila Al-Shami (2016)
Complex but readable history and commentary of the recent politics in Syria and how any attempts to bring freedom of expression and democracy have been squashed.   


Fiction for children (and adults)

After Tomorrow, Gillian Cross (2013) (aged 7 plus)
The fictional story of two children leaving the UK as refugees and how they survive as refugees.    

Welcome to Nowhere, Elizabeth Laird (2017) (aged 7 plus)
The story of a family who get involved in politics in Syria and end up fleeing for their lives and living in Jordan. 

Boy Overboard, Maurice Glietzman
The story of refugees fleeing  Afganistan and making the journey to Australia.

Hidden, Miriam Halahmy
In this story the protagonist is a teenager who faces tough dilemmas when he finds and befriends a migrant who does not have legal rights to remain in the country.